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  • Thursday, September 1 2016
  • Daniel Jiménez
  • Analysis
  • Geopolitics
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The 2016 parliamentary campaign isn’t just a test run for the 2018 presidential race. Russia’s political regime is in search of a governing model that will help it sustain the status quo for the foreseeable future.

Even though the results of the September 18, 2016, Duma elections are easy enough to predict, the vote could still provide some surprises. Clearly, the Kremlin has little appetite for relaxing its wholesale control over Russia’s political system. At the same time, there is a desire to portray the elections as largely fair, to help the regime to bolster its legitimacy among both elites and the broader body politic in the run-up to the 2018 presidential election campaign.

That said, the 2016 parliamentary campaign isn’t just a test run for the 2018 presidential race. Rather, Russia’s political regime—with its neo-corporatist tilt and penchant for personalized power—is in search of a governing model that will help it sustain the status quo for the foreseeable future. And the upcoming Duma and presidential election campaigns, for better or for worse, will help define the parameters for the post-2018 political cycle.

The 2016 parliamentary campaign isn’t just a test run for the 2018 presidential race. Russia’s political regime is in search of a governing model that will help it sustain the status quo for the foreseeable future.

Even though the results of the September 18, 2016, Duma elections are easy enough to predict, the vote could still provide some surprises. Clearly, the Kremlin has little appetite for relaxing its wholesale control over Russia’s political system. At the same time, there is a desire to portray the elections as largely fair, to help the regime to bolster its legitimacy among both elites and the broader body politic in the run-up to the 2018 presidential election campaign.

That said, the 2016 parliamentary campaign isn’t just a test run for the 2018 presidential race. Rather, Russia’s political regime—with its neo-corporatist tilt and penchant for personalized power—is in search of a governing model that will help it sustain the status quo for the foreseeable future. And the upcoming Duma and presidential election campaigns, for better or for worse, will help define the parameters for the post-2018 political cycle.

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